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Other Academic Regulations

OTHER ACADEMIC REGULATIONS
STUDY LIMIT
LEAVE OF ABSENCE
TRANSFERS
RULES ON CONDUCT OF EXAMINATIONS
RULES ON CHEATING
TRIBUNAL OF APPEALS
RESIGNATION
SUSPENSION OF A STUDY PROGRAM
PUBLICATION ETHICS
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY IN RESEARCH AND PUBLICATION
DISCIPLINARY ACTION
GUIDELINES FOR FACULTY
 

 

 

 

  1 STUDY LIMIT
         
    1.1 Full-time doctoral students must complete the requirements for the Doctoral degree within five years from advancement to candidacy. 
         
    1.2 Non-resident doctoral/employee students must complete all requirements within seven years from advancement to candidacy.
         
    1.3 All requirements for the degree must be completed within four years of first registration for the degree of Master.
         
    1.4
 
A Master employee-student enrolled on a part-time status and students under the part-time program must complete all Master degree requirements within five calendar years of first registration.
         
    1.5 A student must complete all the requirements of the diploma program within two years of first registration.
         
    1.6
 
CAS students who failed to transfer to the doctoral program after the fourth semester will have to exit the program and will be awarded a Certificate of Advanced Studies.
       
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  2 PROBATIONARY AND DISMISSAL CONDITIONS
         
    Doctoral Program
     
    2.1 Towards the end of each semester, Doctoral students must demonstrate to their Program Committee that they are making good progress in their coursework or dissertation research. The Program Committee reports progress to the DPRC and then DPRC reports to the Academic Senate. Students will be placed on probation in the succeeding semester if they fail to make satisfactory progress in one or more of the following:  i) coursework performance; ii) independent research potential; and iii) commitment to work on Doctoral studies. 
         
    2.2 A Doctoral student shall be placed on probation:
     
  • if he/she fails to submit a progress report or has not communicated to his/her Advisor regarding his/her progress at the end of the semester. If the student/candidate is on leave, the Chairperson of his/her Program Committee should still report it to DPRC;
  • if his/her cumulative grade point average (cGPA) is less than 3.50 at the end of the semester;
  • if not yet advanced to candidacy after the third semester for full-time students (after the fourth semester for non-resident students);
  • if his/her research progress is assessed unsatisfactory by the Program Committee and DPRC.
         
    2.3 A doctoral student will face dismissal after two consecutive semesters on probation due to low CGPA, late advancement to candidacy and slow research progress. A student on probation due to non-submission of progress report in the previous semester will face dismissal if no progress is submitted by the end of the current semester.
         
   

2.4



2.5

A doctoral student will face dismissal if fees remain unpaid at the end of two consecutive semesters including the semester in which he/she was suspended due to financial liability ((see P&P FB 6-1-1: Credit Policy ( https://www.ait.ac.th/administration/policies-and-procedures/FB/FB-6-1-1).

Students who fail to finish the doctoral degree requirements within the study limit will be automatically dismissed from the doctoral program. Their names will be reported to DPRC and Academic Senate for information only. They can appeal to the Tribunal of Appeals by presenting a concrete plan on how they will finish. If the Tribunal allows further extension, the concerned student can no longer enjoy student privileges (i.e. access to AIT facilities, student accommodation, educational subsidy for children in AITCS, etc.). Failure to meet the conditions of the Tribunal would mean automatic dismissal without any privilege to re-appeal.
         
    2.6
 
A student who failed to register for two consecutive semesters faces dismissal.
       
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    Masters and Diploma Programs
         
    2.7 The grades achieved by a student are reported each semester to the Academic Senate which considers whether students who have not achieved the minimum average stipulated by the Senate may proceed to the next semester of study.
         
    2.8 A student who, in the first semester, achieves an average grade of not less than 2.50 but less than 2.75 will be placed on automatic probation. Thereafter, a student will remain on probation until such time that he/she achieves a cumulative average of not less than 2.75.
         
    2.9 A student on probation for more than two semesters faces dismissal. A student on probation will not be allowed to register for thesis or research study until probation is cleared. A student on probation is also not allowed to enroll in another university as part of a joint or exchange program.
         
    2.10 A Master or Diploma student will face dismissal if fees remain unpaid at the end of two consecutive semesters including the semester in which he/she was suspended due to financial liability (see P&P FB 6-1-1-5: Credit Policy)
       
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  3 LEAVE OF ABSENCE
         
    3.1 Any student who, for reasons other than sickness, will be absent from the academic commitments during the semester or who will be traveling outside Thailand for vacation must seek approval from his/her Advisor and School Dean on a form (Request for Leave of Absence) obtainable from the Registry.
         
    3.2 On return from leave, the student must report to the School and the Registry
         
    3.3 Students absent from the Institute without formal approval of leave will be suspended, and may subsequently be dismissed.
         
    3.4 Occasionally, sickness or other circumstances make it necessary for a student to take extended or full-semester leave from the Institute. A student given an extended leave must write to the Registry at least one month before the agreed date of return to confirm that he/she intends to continue his/her studies. AIT financial aid does not provide travel expenses for students on leave from the Institute, nor can the monthly allowance be continued during periods of extended leave. Extended leave may affect scholarship support.
         
    3.5
For full-time Doctoral students, request for leave of absence after advancement to candidacy is subject to the recommendation of the Program Committee and approval by the School Dean, bearing in mind that the candidate has to satisfy the minimum four-semester residency requirement.  Permission and the length (number of semesters) of leave of absence must also consider: (i) the amount of work required to carry out the research, (ii) the progress and quality of the candidate’s research work, (iii) the time required by the Program Committee to monitor and review/evaluate research progress, and (iv) the speed at which the candidate effectively responds to the Program Committee’s evaluation. Hitherto, leave of absence could be taken up to a maximum of two years from first registration.
       
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  4 TRANSFERS
         
    4.1 Transfer between Options
         
      Transfer between Master's degree thesis, research study or project options requires the approval of the student's Program Committee Chairperson, Field/Area of Study Coordinator and School Dean, who will inform the Registry of the action taken.
         
    4.2 Transfer between Academic Units
         
      Transfer between fields/areas of study and Schools in the Master's degree and the Diploma programs must have the approval of the School Deans involved and the Vice President for Academic Affairs
         
    4.3 Transfer of Programs
         
      i) Students who have previously been dismissed from the Institute shall normally not be re‑admitted to a degree program at the same level (AS94.16). This regulation does not preclude transfer from a Master's  degree program to a Diploma program, nor from a Doctoral degree program to a Master's degree program or Diploma program.
         
      ii) A student enrolled in a Diploma program may request a transfer to the Master's degree program. A grade point average significantly above 2.75 is normally required before an application to transfer can be considered. The current practice is to consider such a transfer only when the candidate's current semester GPA is not less than 3.00. If a transfer between programs is approved, then a request to transfer credits and grades should be recommended by the Advisor, Field/Area of Study Coordinator for approval of the School Dean
         
      iii) Transfers cannot be made from a Certificate to a Diploma or Master's degree program for students who have been previously transferred to the Certificate or Diploma program from a Master's program on academic grounds.
         
      iv) Students who are registered for the Diploma program and expect to transfer to the Master's degree program are advised to request transfer of programs before completion of their Diploma program
         
      v) Subject to approval by the Academic Senate on a case-by-case basis: (1) students completing enrollment as Diploma students can receive the Dip .AIT and re-apply for admission to the Master's degree program; and that (2) students currently enrolled as Diploma students should be awarded the Dip.AIT with the formality of transfer to the Master's degree program to be completed as a separate matter.
         
      vi) Course and research credits which have been earned for an AIT Certificate, AIT Diploma, or on a Special Program may count towards partial fulfillment of the credit requirements for the AIT Master's degree, provided the credits have been earned not more than five years earlier and provided that they have been earned in the same or related fields (AS 90.46.01).
         
      vii) Transfer from the Master's degree program to the Diploma program for students with scholarship should be discussed with the Coordinator, Admissions and Scholarships. Such transfers require the recommendation of the student's Advisor, Field/Area of Study Coordinator and the School Dean.
         
      viii) Transfers from the Certificate Program to the Diploma or Master's degree Programs are permitted only if the candidate meets all the requirements for admission to the Master's degree or Diploma Program while enrolled in the Certificate Program. It is thus necessary for Certificate students hoping to transfer to the degree program to be made clearly aware in advance of the pre-requisites for such a transfer. The recommendation of the Advisor and the Field/Area of Study Coordinator and also the approval of the School Dean are required for all Certificate to Diploma or Master's degree Program transfers. Following approval to transfer, the Advisor must initiate a request to the School Dean for the approval of credits (and/or grades) to be transferred to the new program.
         
      ix) Request for transfer should be made by completing the ‘Degree Program Transfer Form’.
       
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    4.4 Transfer of Doctoral Student Category (Full time to Non-resident)
       
      i) Transfer from full-time to non-resident status is not allowed for Doctoral students except for very special cases. The conditions assessed by the Program Committee to justify such transfers are:
       
  • all the requirements for non-resident Doctoral student status have been met as follows: in residence at AIT while pursuing courses full time; or register for courses, study in his or her own, fulfill all other coursework requirements and attend all examinations; or a combination of the above;
  • the nature of research work allows non-frequent physical presence on campus; and
  • likelihood of productive research.
       
      ii) Before advancement to candidacy, a transfer to non-residential status is not feasible. After advancement to candidacy, a transfer may be approved upon the recommendation of the Program Committee, endorsement of the DPRC and approval of the School Dean.
       
      iii) Non-resident students are granted accommodation for a maximum of five months per year and are granted other student privileges similar to full-time students.
       
    4.5 CREDIT TRANSFER
     
      4.5.1 Doctoral Program
       
     

i.   

Courses completed at another graduate school or institution may be transferred towards the partial completion of the credit requirement of the AIT doctoral program at the discretion of the Field of Study/Program and if the following conditions are satisfied:
  • courses were taken under the doctoral program;
  • have at least passing grades;
  • with equivalent graduate courses at AIT;
  • completed within the last 5 years; and
  • students transferring course credits should not have been dismissed from the previous institution/university.
       
     

ii.   

Method of Transfer. Transfer of credits for the doctoral program is done through ‘Credit by Examination’ following the procedures below:
  • The School/Field of Study determines from the official transcript the credits to be validated and lists these credits on the Validation by Examination form.
  • The Field of Study then conducts the examination, the content and extent of which the FoS Coordinator determines, and reports the results of the examination to the Admissions and Scholarships Unit via the Validation by Examination form.
  • To be acceptable, the Validation by Examination form must be signed by the Dean and then forwards a request to Registry for appropriate entries to be made on the student’s record.
       
     

iii.   

The evaluation criteria are as follows:
  • Credits are awarded only for courses with a validation grade of at least 3.50 (B+).
  • Credits are transferred, but grade points are not.
  • Grades earned at other universities as well as the grades obtained from the validation examination are not used in calculating a student’s grade-point average while attending AIT.
  • Only up to a maximum of 9 credits may be transferred .
         
     

iv.   

For every credit transferred, a fee will be charged .
       
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      4.5.2 Master Leading to the Doctoral Program.
         
     

i.   

Courses completed at another graduate school or institution may be transferred towards the partial completion of the credit requirement of the AIT master leading to doctoral program at the discretion of the Field of Study/Program and if the following conditions are satisfied:
  • courses were taken under the master’s program;
  • have at least passing grades;
  • with equivalent graduate courses at AIT;
  • completed within the last 5 years; and
  • students transferring course credits should not have been dismissed from the previous institution/university.
         
     

ii.   

Method of Transfer and Evaluation Criteria . The method of transfer and the evaluation criteria that guide the transfer of credits in the doctoral program are similarly enforced in transfering credits to the master leading to doctoral program.
       
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      4.5.3 Master's Program
         
     

i.   

Courses completed at another graduate school or institution may be transferred towards the partial completion of the credit requirement of the AIT master’s program at the discretion of the Field of Study/Program and if the following conditions are satisfied:
  • courses were taken under a relevant graduate program;
  • have at least passing grades (with equivalent grade of at least 3.00/4.00 or “A, B+ or B ); (Note: Credits for c oursework completed on a pass-fail or satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis can only be transferred through ‘credit by examination’.);
  • with equivalent graduate courses at AIT);
  • completed within the last 5 years;
  • clearly stipulated in the relevant Memorandum of Understanding or Agreement;
  • only elective courses can be transferred;
  • students transferring course credits should not have been dismissed from the previous institution/university; and
  • for collaborative programs, the number of credits that may be transferred will be as approved by the Academic Senate.
         
     

ii.   

Methods of Transfer .An official transcript sent directly from the registrar or other appropriate official at the other university/institution to AIT Registry is required. The course outline and information on the conversion of course units to semester hours of credit should be provided by the university/institution from which credits are being transferred. Transfer of credits for the master’s program is done following the methods below:

  • Credit Transfer from Partner Universities/Institutions . Course credits are automatically converted and transferred from a university/ institution where AIT has an active agreement under the following degree categories: (a) exchange program; (b) dual-degree program; (c) two-phase program. It is assumed that prior to signing these agreements, a comprehensive review of courses/credits to be exchanged and/or transferred have been undertaken.
     
  • Credit Transfer from Other Universities/Institutions. Credits may also be transferred and converted from a university/institution without a formal agreement with AIT through (a) credit by examination or (b) credit by validation methods.

(a) Credit by Examination

  1. The School/Field of Study determines from the official transcript the credits to be validated and lists these credits on the Validation by Examination form.
     
  2. The Field of Study then conducts an examination, the content and extent of which the FoS Coordinator determines, and reports the results of the examination to the Admissions and Scholarships Unit via the Validation by Examination form.
     
  3. To be acceptable, the Validation by Examination form must be signed by the Dean and then forwards a request to Registry for appropriate entries to be made on the candidate’s record.

(b) Credit by Validation

  1. The School/Field of Study determines from the official transcript the credits to be validated and lists these credits on the Credit by Validation form.
     
  2. The Field of Study then conducts a review, the content and extent of which the Field of Study Coordinator determines, and reports the results of the review to Registry via the Credit by Validation form. Registry then records the appropriate entries on the candidate’s record.
         
     

iii.   

Evaluation Criteria

  • Credits are awarded only for courses with a validation grade of at least 3.00/4.00 (B+).
  • Credits are transferred, but grade points are not.
  • Grades earned at other universities as well as the grades obtained from the validation examination are not used in calculating a student’s grade-point average while attending AIT.
  • When not specified in any agreement, up to a maximum of 12 credits can be transferred.
       
     

iv.   

Transfer Fee. For every credit transferred, a fee will be charged
       
     

v.   

The details on credit transfer are in P&P AA 8-5-2: Guidelines for Transfer of Credits to AIT ( http://www.ait.ac.th/administration/policies-and-procedures/AA/aa-8-5-2-20-jul-2009.pdf )
       
      4.5.4 Diploma Program
       
     

i.   

Credits received under the Diploma program may be transferred to the Master's degree program subject to the approval of the Program Committee appointed for each student, Field/Area of Study Coordinator and School Dean.
       
     

ii.   

Transfer of credits for work completed at another graduate school is not permitted for the Diploma program.
       
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  5 RULES ON CONDUCT OF EXAMINATIONS
         
    1. Examinations should be held in rooms which permit seating of students separated by one meter and/or should be arranged so that there is space equivalent to one empty seat or desk between each pair of students.
    2. Students must put their ID cards on the table for inspection.
    3. Students must be assigned to seats rather than being permitted to choose where they sit.
    4. The course instructor or the co-course instructor should be available throughout the examination to answer legitimate questions. There must be one invigilator for every 30 students taking the exam. Invigilators must be faculty, staff or doctoral co-teachers who are duly authorized by the School Dean and whose names have been submitted to Registry.
    5. As an option, there could be at least two sets of exam questions in order to reduce the chance that students can copy answers from one another. This can be done by varying the order of questions, by varying the problem parameters for questions involving calculation, and by varying the order of answers for multiple-choice questions.
    6. In closed-book examinations, examiners will invigilate carefully to prevent or detect infringements of rules on talking, exchanging information, consulting data brought illegally into the exam room, consulting data or informants outside the exam room. All belongings must be set aside prior to start of examination.
    7. In open-book examinations, examiners will invigilate carefully to prevent or detect infringements or previously specified rules on: talking, exchanging information, exchanging written information sources, consulting information beyond that allowed into the exam room, consulting data outside the exam room.  The Course Instructor must define what materials are allowed inside the exam room.
    8. There should be no take-home final exams.
    9. Mid-semester examinations should be held during class hours or other schedule arranged by the course instructor in agreement with the whole class. No mid-semester examinations should be scheduled in such a way as to interfere with the regular teaching timetable.
    10. The timing and location of all written final examinations must be scheduled by Registry, taking into account class size, duration, exam time-table clashes and adjacencies, and previous formal requests for early exams. Registry will assign final examination rooms according to the number of examinees and following the space requirement mentioned above. No exams will be held in tiered lecture rooms. No changes to the published schedule should be made without the authorization of Registry.
       
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  6 RULES ON CHEATING
         
    6.1 Cheating in an examination, assignment or research project is dealt with as an offence. It involves any of the following actions*:
     
  1. Students having unauthorized items, devices or texts (as defined  by the instructor) at his/her desk in an examination room during an examination;
  2. Making use of unauthorized items, devices or texts in an assignment, research project or during an examination;
  3. Copying from the examination book of another student during an examination or copying from another student’s assignment or research project;
  4. Soliciting help from another student during an examination;
  5. Intentionally giving help to another student during the examination;
  6. Acting deliberately in any way, whether before, during, or after, so as to obtain an unfair advantage in an examination; and
  7. Acting in any way, whether before, during or after, so as to assist another student to obtain an unfair advantage in an examination, assignment or research project.
        *    Some definitions were extracted from Bristol University, UK.
         
    6.2 Procedures for  Investigation and Disciplinary Action
         
     
  1. Record. If there is suspicion of cheating during an examination, in an assignment or a research project, the instructor/invigilator should immediately call the attention of the student and put a notation on segments of the exam, assignment or project where cheating has been suspiciously committed.
  2. Incident Report. The instructor/invigilator should seek an explanation from the student at the end of the examination or when the assignment or project was submitted, and submit an incident report to the Field of Study Coordinator, who should then notify the School Dean.
  3. Interview of Student. The instructor/invigilator,  Field of Study Coordinator and the School Dean will decide based on the incident report, whether the case can be handled at the School level.  If it can be handled at the School, the Field of Study Coordinator together with the instructor/ invigilator will interview the student. The student can be accompanied by his/her advisor. Notes of the interview will be recorded and should be agreed upon by all parties.
  4. Without Evidence of Cheating. If the interview panel is satisfied that there is no evidence of cheating, the Field of Study Coordinator and the instructor/invigilator may recommend to the School Dean to give no penalty.
  5. With Concrete Evidence of Cheating. However, if cheating was proven, the Field of Study Coordinator and the instructor/invigilator may recommend to the School Dean to disregard the original examination score and require the student to submit an equivalent piece of work or retake a different version of the examination.  Upon receipt of the retake, the School Dean may decide to:
    • Downgrade by 1 step the grade the student will receive upon repetition of the exam or resubmission of the assignment/project;
    • Give a score of ‘zero’ for the specific exam, project or assignment; or
    • Give a failing grade or “F” for the course; or
    • Recommend the student for suspension or dismissal.

    The penalty will depend on the seriousness of the offence. The student will have the usual right to appeal against the decision. The appeal should be addressed to the School Dean.

  6. Suspension or Dismissal from the Institute. If School Dean feels that there is evidence of serious dishonesty and the recommendation of the Field of Study Coordination and instructor/invigilator was suspension or dismissal, the matter should be elevated to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
    6.3 Procedures for Assessment at the Administration
         
     
  1. The Head, Student Office will be delegated or anybody on behalf of the Vice President for Academic Affairs to interview the student concerned.
  2. Upon receipt of the incident report based on student’s interview, the Vice President for Academic Affairs will then appoint a neutral investigating committee consisting of members from outside the School where the student belongs.
  3. The investigating committee should consider all the available evidence, including that of the incident report submitted by the School, and the student accused. The committee will then submit to the Vice President for Academic Affairs a report of its findings and, if it wishes, a recommendation on action. This report should be submitted promptly, if possible permitting the required action to be taken before the beginning of the next semester.
    6.4 Penalty at the Disposal of the Administration.On receipt of the recommendation of the investigating committee, the Vice President for Academic Affairs will determine the appropriate penalty depending on the seriousness of the offense.  The Vice President for Academic Affairs may:
         
     
  • No penalty; or
  • Downgrade by 1 step the grade the student will receive upon repetition of the exam or resubmission of the assignment/project;
  • Give a score of ‘zero’ for the specific exam, project or assignment; or
  • Give a failing grade or “F” for the course; or
  • Suspend the student from the Institute for a specific period; or
  • Recommend dismissal especially if there is evidence that the incident is already the second offence, a report to the Academic Senate should be made for decision.
      The penalty will depend on the seriousness of the offence. The student will have the usual right to appeal against the decision. The appeal should be addressed to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
         
    6.5 Dismissal and Appeal. A student found guilty of grave cheating by the School Dean, the Vice President for Academic Affairs and the Academic Senate may be dismissed. The  student  pursues an appeal to the President, in which case the Tribunal of Appeals may be convened.
       
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  7 TRIBUNAL OF APPEALS
         
    7.1 A Tribunal of Appeal has been established by the President to consider appeals made by students against decisions on dismissal from academic programs made by the Academic Senate. The Tribunal is composed of the President (Chairperson), the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the Head, Student Office, the Field of Study Coordinator, the student’s Advisor and the Dean of the School concerned, with the Registry Officer and the President of the Student Union in attendance.
         
    7.2 An appeal against a Senate decision is made by the student through his/her Advisor, Field/Area of Study Coordinator and School Dean to the President no later than one week before the start of the following semester. Comment on the appeal is expected from the School Dean. A decision by the Tribunal is final. Because questions relating to health, family circumstances, financial realities, etc. are outside the scope of the Senate, they are taken into account by the Tribunal, who may modify a decision of the Senate.
         
    7.3 No appeal will be accepted from any student who is in debt to the Institute.
         
    7.4 Academic Senate-dismissed students  who appealed to the Tribunal of Appeals and allowed to continue with certain conditions, should be automatically dismissed without any discussion in the Academic Senate and without any privilege to re-appeal, if they fail to fulfill the conditions set by the Tribunal for the continuation of their study.
       
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  8 RESIGNATION
         
    8.1 A student who wishes to resign should normally do so in writing to his/her Advisor who reports through the Field/Area of Study Coordinator and subsequently to the School Dean. A student's resignation shall be effective from the time the Dean acknowledges the resignation and passes the case to the Registry. The Registry records the action on the transcript and informs the administrative units within the Institute of the resignation of the student.
         
    8.2 If a student who has resigned subsequently changes his/her mind, he/she would normally have to re‑apply for admission. A student cannot nullify the act of resignation once it has become effective.
         
    8.3 The transcript of a student who has resigned shall have entered on it:
     
  • the date of resignation, and
  • grades of all courses completed at the time of resignation.
    8.4 Procedures with regard to Doctoral student resignations, particularly when the student has already completed the semester's work including examinations, should be initiated by the student to the Chairperson of the Program Committee. If the student is resigning mainly to avoid dismissal, the School and the DPRC should record its intention that the student is not eligible for re-admission rather than its intention to dismiss the student.
       
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  9 SUSPENSION OF A STUDY PROGRAM
         
    A student whose fees remain unpaid on or before the start of the semester will be ‘suspended’ due to financial liability, effective January 2007 semester (please see 12.5).
         
  10 PUBLICATION ETHICS
         
    10.1

For publications based on student theses, research studies or projects, the name of the student should be included as an author of the publication.

The sequence of authors' names should be up to the authors themselves, but should follow convention within the subject reported, and should not belittle the input of the student.

It is appropriate to include, wherever the style of the journal permits, in a footnote on the title page or in the acknowledgements, the following:

"This paper is based (or partly based) on M .Eng .,  M.Sc. (or MBA) research study (or thesis or research project) conducted by the first author under the supervision (or guidance) of the second author at (name of field/area of study) of the (name of School), AIT, Bangkok."

         
    10.2 For publications based on dissertations, the student must be the first author of the publication unless there is documented evidence that the journal required that the authorship should be written in a different order (AS02.15)
       
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  11 ACADEMIC INTEGRITY IN RESEARCH AND PUBLICATION
         
    11.1 Definitions
       
      Research is the creative expression of scholarship against which the quality of teaching and viability of the Institute’s graduate programs hinge. There are basically three different types of research which are recognized and supported by the Institute:
         
      i) Independent research is one which is based on the faculty’s interests and capabilities in the academic fields of the Institute. This is usually carried out in conjunction with student research.
         
      ii) Sponsored research is one which is based on specific areas of interest of the Institute, mainly funded by sponsors, and supplemented by Institute subsidies. Research may be sponsored by a government agency, private or non-government organization, foundation, or individual. Sponsored research projects are based on problems relevant to the development of the region and to the education of AIT students who are being prepared to participate in the development of their own countries. Such research projects involve both  faculty and students, the participation of the latter to be as part of their master or doctoral degree requirements. The direct beneficiaries of research output are the profession, society or country.
         
      iii) Contracted research is one which is based on the specific needs and interests of external clients who underwrite the cost of the research in return for access to the results. The external client expects to benefit from the research delivered to the client, usually in the form of reports, softwares  or prototypes. Contracted research may entail confidentiality and restriction on publication.
         
      Research outputs invariably result in publications in journals, conference proceedings, books, and the like. Publication helps disseminate the research results for furtherance of research endeavors, for scrutiny by peer groups, and for utilization of applicable information for public good.
       
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    11.2 Publication and Authorship
         
      Publication record is perhaps the most important measure of performance of academic institutions. High quality publications are indispensable for promotion of faculty to higher academic ranks. Authorship of academic papers is thus highly valued. Authorship, however, confers responsibility and accountability of information contained in the manuscript. Authors of research papers, for example, implicitly endorse that the research was conducted as it is described. Authors must be responsible for what has been written in return for the credit and recognition that authorship brings.
       
     
  1. It is to be expected that each author/co-author has: (a) made a significant contribution to the article design, data analysis and interpretation, and other scholarly effort, (b) participated in the article preparation, and (c) approved the manuscript.
  2. For any multi-authored article based on a student thesis, research study or dissertation, the student should normally be the first author, unless there is documented evidence that the journal required that the authorship should be written in a different order.
  3. Authorship is not sufficiently justifiable where participation is only through acquisition of funding, collection of data, general supervision of a research unit, or performance of normal duties of the job of a research support staff.
  4. Honorary or courtesy authorship is not acceptable.
       
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    11.3 Academic Misconduct
         
      All members of the AIT community are expected to comply with the relevant Institute policy and procedures in the conduct of research and to observe high standards of academic integrity and ethical behavior in publishing research outputs by self-regulation and by adherence to professional standards. Serious deviations from commonly accepted practices in the academic community constitute academic misconduct, including, but not limited to the following:
         
     
  1. Deliberate fabrication of information, including falsification of data, credentials or other academically-related information.
     
  2. Appropriation of research work done by others, including plagiarism (e.g. presenting methods, data or conclusions from a research project in which one has had no involvement, and direct copying of textual material), with intentional omission of acknowledgements.
     
  3. Use of data of a confidential nature, particularly that of a contracted research where secrecy may be necessary for a limited period, for one’s personal advantage or that of a third party.
     
  4. Intentional or reckless violation of the principles of authorship.
     
  5. Other conduct which seriously deviates from accepted ethical standards in scholarship.
         
      Difference of interpretation or judgment, or honest error, do not constitute academic misconduct.
       
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    11.4 STUDENT RESEARCH PLAGIARISM CHECK
         
      To guard against plagiarism, all student research reports will be subjected to electronic plagiarism check before they are sent to external examiners and before final defense is conducted.
         
     
  1. The Chair confirms in the Dissertation Dispatch Form that the dissertation has been subjected to electronic plagiarism check and cleared.
  2. Guidelines and Process for Final Plagiarism Check
    • The student submits the report final dissertation/thesis/research study  /research project to the electronic plagiarism checking system at least 14 days before the final examination.
    • The system returns the Originality report to the Library.
    • Within one week, the Library reviews and analyzes the Originality report and send the Originality report to the Chair of the student’s research committee.
    • If the submitted paper is likely to contain plagiarized material, the Library also sends a remark to the Chair.
    • The Chair reviews the Originality report and informs the student.
    • In case of plagiarism, the Chair requests the student to correct the report.
    • The student makes the corrections and submits the corrected version to the Chair.
    • The Chair approves the scheduling of the dissertation/thesis/research study/ research project final examination. The final examination will be delayed if the student can not submit the corrected version within the specified time.
    • The Chair confirms in the Record of Comprehensive Examination or Record of Thesis/Research Study/Project Examination that the report has been subjected to electronic plagiarism checking and cleared.
  3. Any attempt to circumvent the plagiarism check is considered a form of academic misconduct.
    11.5 Disciplinary Action
         
      Any member of the AIT community who is aware of academic misconduct in research or publication may report the incident or practice to the School Dean or directly to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.  The procedures for disciplinary actions shall be according to the Institute Policy and Procedures on Employment of Faculty and of Staff: General Work Regulations.
       
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  12   DISCIPLINARY ACTION
         
    12.1 Discipline
         
      11.1.1 In the Institute’s history, extreme disciplinary action has rarely been taken against a student. Given the maturity of the student body, there is no reason to think that disciplinary action will be required more frequently. However, when a case does arise, it is helpful to know what procedures should be followed. The following procedures have been approved by the President and have been endorsed by the Student Union
         
      11.1.2 A complaint against a student should be made to the Head, Student Office. If the matter cannot be settled informally, the complaint must be confirmed in writing and be presented by the complainant to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, who will decide whether or not to proceed with an investigation.
         
      11.1.3 If an investigation is authorized, a meeting of the Standing Disciplinary Commission will be convened, which constitutes the following membership:
         
       
  • Vice President for Academic Affairs
  • Head, Student Office
  • Secretary of the Commission (to be appointed by the Head, Student Office )
        Additional members for cases involving students:
         
       
  • Dean concerned
  • Field/Area of Study Coordinator concerned
  • Student Advisor
  • Student Union President
  • Campus Counselors (if it relates to community living)
      11.1.4 Before the Commission convenes, Student Office Head will inform the student concerned of the complaint made against him or her.
         
      11.1.5 The student against whom the complaint has been made shall have the right to be present while the Commission hears the evidence against him or her. He/She may question witnesses.
         
      11.1.6 The Commission’s first responsibility will be to determine, as far as possible, the truth of the complaint made and its seriousness and make recommendations of disciplinary measures to be taken, if any.
       
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    12.2   Penalties
         
     

The most extreme penalty that the Institute can impose is dismissal. Less severe penalties include:

       
  • suspension for a stated period
  • expulsion or suspension from the dormitory;
  • prohibition from entering certain AIT buildings;
  • suspension of library borrowing;
  • a fine;
  • a public warning;
  • performance of some useful task in the community or on the campus;
  • being declared persona non grata;
  • prohibition from being employed at the Institute
       
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        Responsibility for offering appropriate courses rests with the Schools. New courses are considered by the Academic Development and Review Committee (ADRC), and recommended to the Academic Senate. A review of all current courses for modification, revision and overlap is undertaken at least once every two years by the ADRC, using the checklist below:
 
        Is the course content revised from one offering to another?
        Is there a well-defined teaching and a regular homework schedule?
        Is there a well-balanced reading list with clearly identified readings of manageable length complementing each lecture? Are these readings seriously required?
        Do readings cover a variety of sources or a single text?
        What is the standing of the text used?
        Do course content and readings integrate with recent advances in the field in the latest journals?
        Do exercises used challenge the student to apply his/her mind or offer situational problems requiring application of fixed rules and formulations?
        Does the instructor communicate with his/her professional peers, outside AIT about teaching, and exchange teaching materials with them?
        Is there evidence of the instructor's teaching materials and publications being used by peers in the courses offered in other universities?
        Are examinations open book or closed book?
        Is grading based on a variety of attributes or a few examinations?
 
        After completion, the review is reported to the Academic Senate. A list of approved courses appears in some detail in the Catalog of Courses. Exceptions are Selected Topics and Special Study courses, which are flexible in content and are adapted to suit the needs of the students concerned and the interests of the faculty members. The Special Study credit value varies according to the content of the course, but cannot exceed 6 credits.
 
        No undergraduate courses in any discipline should be included in the regular School curriculum or offered as Selected Topics (AS00.49).
 
        The introduction of a new course is a matter of recommendation from the School to the ADRC. Proposals must be presented in the form of a catalog description and be accompanied by a more detailed course description of the kind that is posted before registration. Proposals approved by the ADRC are referred to the Academic Senate for approval.  
 
        A new course should be assigned a new number by the School; the number of a course which will no longer be taught should be left intact for at least four semesters before it is assigned to other courses.
 
        Course instructors are responsible for provid­ing a detailed description of the course they will be offering in the coming semester, at least one week before registration for continuing students. One copy should be posted by the School on the notice boards, and a second copy sent to the Regis­try. A collection of all current detailed course descriptions must be available in the Library and the Registry for consultation by faculty and students.
 
        If a course instructor is a Doctoral student, the course may not be offered for credit to other Doctoral students. In some circumstances, a specific course may be offered for credit to diploma and certificate students, but not to Doctoral and Master’s students.
 
        It is the responsibility of a course instructor to provide opportunities for student consultation and to indicate to students when they are available. An instructor must inform a student's Dean immediately if it becomes apparent that a student is making insufficient progress (the Dean will inform the Advisor).
 
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        The following guidelines on the use of written materials should be observed:
 
-      fundamental texts should be used for basic courses, and handouts for the more advanced courses; and
-      only printed lecture notes should be used.
 
            The list of textbooks to be used in a given semester is posted by Field/Area of Study prior to registration for continuing students.
 
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        The following practices on lectures should be observed:
 
-      a lecture should not exceed one and a half hours per day;
-      course lecture hours should not exceed six hours a week;
-      the total number of lecture hours for which credit is allowed should not exceed 20 hours per week; and
-      any exceptions to the above restrictions require the approval of the VPAA.
 
        Lectures begin at the time indicated on the class schedule and are expected to last not more than fifty minutes, to give time for students to move to the next class.
 
        Lecture classes of longer duration than fifty minutes are to be avoided, if possible, because their effectiveness decreases markedly as the period of uninterrupted study lengthens. One and a half hour classes should be avoided for the additional reason that they use two hours on the class schedule.
 
        Adjunct faculty who find it convenient to teach two hours on the same day should arrange an interval of at least one hour between classes.
 
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        Make-up classes should be avoided except in extreme emergency. No make-up classes at all should be arranged after mid-semester.
 
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            The responsibilities of Advisors are as follows:
 
i)        to meet their students individually when they enter the Institute and to establish a relationship in which the student is aware of the Advisor's interest in his/her progress and of his/her willingness to advise and assist; Advisors must be available for consultation by their students;
 
ii)       to assist students in the preparation of their individual study plans;
 
iii)      to approve a student's course registrations for review by the Field/Area of Study Coordinator;
 
iv)      to consider and recommend to the Field/Area of Study Coordinator a student's request to drop or add a course;
 
v)       to advise their students on both academic and non-academic matters and, when appropriate, to refer them to other members of the staff (e.g. the course instructor, the Medical Officer, the Associate Registrar for Student Affairs, etc.);
 
vi)      to keep themselves informed of the progress of their students throughout each semester, to review their mid-semester and final grades and to provide students with some type of assessment of the program and courses;
 
vii)     to meet their students from time to time (especially those having difficulty with their studies). A meeting with each first and second semester student after the publication of mid-semester grades is strongly recommended;
 
viii)    to report to the Registry if any of his/her students are absent at the beginning of the semester;
 
ix)      to report to the School Dean and to the Academic Senate on students recommended for dismissal;
 
x)       to request the School Dean to appoint a temporary Advisor when the regular Advisor goes on leave;
 
xi)      to consider and recommend to the School Dean requests from students to take leave out of Thailand or to be absent from AIT during semester time.
 
 
 
The responsibilities of a course instructor are as follows:
 
i)        to inform a student's Field/Area of Study Coordinator immediately if it becomes apparent that the student is making insufficient progress (the Field/Area of Study Coordinator will inform the Advisor);
ii)       to be available for consultation by the students;
 
iii)      to provide students with some type of assessment of their progress in the courses other than the assessment given in the final examination.
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